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CULINARY GARDEN



EACH OF US REACTS DIFFERENTLY TO SMELL AND TASTE. IT IS DEEPLY PERSONAL. TASTE BUDS PERCEIVE:

SALTY
SWEET
SOUR
BITTER

TASTES AND SMELLS WORK TOGETHER AS WE EAT. HERBS ENHANCE THE FLAVOR OF FOOD.

Use twice as much fresh as dried herbs. Dried herbs are dehydrated and so more concentrated.
Good for a low salt, low fat diet to make foods taste better.
Use in stir fries, for meat rubs, in pasta salads. Use pesto mixed into pasta.
Use herb combinations such as basil, parsley and chives.
Use an herb chart to enhance cooking.
Use dill in potato salad.
Use lemon verbena in fruit salad.
Fry potatoes with marjoram.
Put peppery nasturtiums or other edible flowers in salads.
Use sage in stuffing.
Tarragon goes great with chicken or fish.



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BASIL


30 to 50 varieties
Weak mint scent, forceful flavor. Sweet basil may have a bitter taste. Varieties may have scents of anise, mint, cinnamon or clove. Citrus basil is mild with the aroma of ornage blossoms.
Basil's essential oils, as many herbs, are contained in microscopic sacs. When brushed or chewed the sacs rupture releasing fragrance.

MINT


More than 25 species.
Aggressive and invasive, naturalized in damp areas throughout the US.


STEVIA


10 to 15 times as sweet as sugar. Banned in 1991 as unstable. Ban lifted in 1995.


COMPANION PLANTINGS (May repel insects, attract beneficial insect polinators. Also may interfere with growth).


Plant chives and basil near tomatoes.
Keep rue away from tomatoes.
Keep onion away from peas and beans.
Plant mustard near carrots.
Mint attracts bees.


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Plants in the culinary garden include:
fennel, nasturtium, rosemary, oregano, chives, calendula, cilantro, tarragon, curly parsley, flat leaf parsley, thyme, lemon balm, pineapple sage, stevia, dill, lemon verbena, sweet basil, purple basil, pesto basil